Pickerel

Pickerel

Pickerel – walleye...whatever you want to call this fish but I grew up using the name pickerel. It is my absolute favourite fish! As a kid I remember my mom getting a hundred pickerel on any given day from the commercial fishermen in the late winter and she would fillet and freeze them all in one evening. The best part was that the fillets were guaranteed 99.9% boneless! We ate pickerel 2 to 3 times a week.
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Caribou

Caribou

Caribou hunting is something we do as a family. We go by ATV for the day, leaving early in the morning so we can get back before dark. When we kill a caribou we skin, gut and quarter the animal on the spot, wrap what we bring back in tarps so the meat doesn’t get dirty and strap the tarps onto the ATVs. We all look forward to this trip every year!
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From the Fish

What foods do you enjoy that are From the Fish? Share your favourites by submitting an Indigenous Food and help us show the world how connected we are to Indigenous Foods! Arctic char Sockeye salmon Atlantic cod Pickerel Northern pike Lake trout Eggs (roe)  
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Grouse

From the Bird

What foods do you enjoy that are From the Bird? Share your favourites by submitting an Indigenous Food and help us show the world how connected we are to Indigenous Foods! Canada goose Snow goose Ptarmigan Grouse Pheasant Eggs Gull eggs Goose eggs Tern eggs  
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From the Big Four Legged

What foods do you enjoy that are From the Big Four Legged?  Share your favourites by submitting an Indigenous Food and help us show the world how connected we are to Indigenous Foods! Caribou Moose Elk Deer Mountain sheep Bear  
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Moose Stew

Moose Stew

Every fall my brother goes moose hunting with his friends.  When they bring back a moose, my family looks forward to a delicious bowl of his moose stew.  Here is his recipe. Cut moose meat into cubes (about 1 inch square).  Add a teaspoon of salt and ½ teaspoon of pepper to the cup of flour.  Then coat the meat cubes with the flour and shake off any excess.  Heat 3 tablespoons of cooking oil in a large frying pan and add the meat cubes (the meat should sizzle when it touches the pan).  Fry the meat just until is brown on all sides and remove to a large pot with a lid. Brown the meat in batches of about 8-10 cubes at a time (if there is too much meat in the pan the meat will just steam instead of brown).  Afterwards, use the same frying pan with residue from browning left on the bottom, to fry the chopped onion and garlic.  Fry at low heat so the onion and garlic don’t burn. Add the onion and garlic to the pot with the meat. Add enough liquid to the pot to just cover the meat.  For the liquid, homemade moose broth or chicken broth adds good flavour.  If you don’t have this, bought beef or chicken broth works well.  Add a ½ cup of whole tomatoes for a bit of tangy taste if you like.  Simmer at low-medium heat, with the lid on, on the stovetop (or in a 325 degree oven if you have an oven-proof pot).  Cook for at least 1 hour or until the meat is tender enough that a fork goes into it easily. Add the chopped vegetables and cook for another 30 minutes or longer, until the vegetables are tender. Near the end of cooking, mix about 3 of tablespoons of flour or gravy browning into a cup of cold water and mix until it is like a thin paste.  Add this mixture to the stew pot and cook for another 10 minutes or so, until the stew has thick gravy.  Another way to thicken the stew is to fry 3 tablespoons of flour in 3 tablespoons of oil until golden-brown.  Whisk in some soup stock, a little at a time until you have a smooth paste and add this to the pot, cooking until the stew is thick. Season with salt and pepper to taste.  Enjoy! -        Photo by Tracy Ruta Fuchs
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Pickled beets

Pickled Beets

Growing beets is a great way to liven up any northern garden. The leaves are a nutritious addition to soups or sautéed on their own with a little garlic and butter. To pick leaves, pull plant out leaving one beet plant six inches this will give room for nearby beet roots to grow. Once the beet roots start to get big you can put some up in jars by pickling them. My family loves putting out a plate of pickled beets for big dinners, but they are great for snacking on or putting in sandwiches. Photo credit: CIER Pre heat oven to 325oF. Wash beets, removing leaves, and place in a roasting or baking pan with ½ inch of water. Roast beets for about 45 minutes. Beets should be tender, easily pierced with a fork. Once done allow to cool for 15 minutes. Trim the ends and peel off skins. Cut beets into slices or wedges. In large saucepan, bring vinegar, water, sugar and salt to boil; boil until sugar and salt are dissolved, about 5 minutes. Wash and boil three 500 ml canning jars in a large pot for 15 minutes. Soak lids in hot water. Divide the remaining spices into the jars and tightly pack within beets leaving about an inch to the rim. Pour hot vinegar mixture into packed jars, leaving ½ inch of space. Cover with canning lids. Screw on bands and boil in a large pot or water canner for 30 minutes. Pull the beets out to cool. Once they have cooled down, check the seals by removing the bands and tipping the jars upside down. If any liquid escapes they have not been sealed. Unsealed jars will keep for at least 2 months in the fridge. Sealed jars can be kept in a dark, cool place for at least 8 months.
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Kettle

Beverages & Teas

What Indigenous Beverages and Teas do you enjoy? Share your favourites by submitting an Indigenous Food and help us show the world how connected we are to Indigenous Foods! Wild mint Nettle tea Labrador tea  
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Corn

Nuts, Seeds, Grains

What foods do you enjoy that are Nuts, Seeds, or Grains? Share your favourites by submitting an Indigenous Food and help us show the world how connected we are to Indigenous Foods! Wild rice Corn Acorns Pine nuts Rosehips  
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Wild Mushrooms

Vegetables

What Indigenous vegetables do you enjoy? Share your favourites by submitting an Indigenous Food and help us show the world how connected we are to Indigenous Foods! Fiddlehead ferns Wild onion Indian celery Wild mushrooms Wild roots (e.g. cattail) Seaweed (e.g. dulce) Wild shoots  
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